Dog Breeding as an Investment: The Start Up Cost

As a veterinary assistant, I see a lot of people who breed dogs. I have seen people make $1200 off of a litter, and I have seen people lose $800 and a beloved pet. Before you decide to breed, please consider the following.

Research

Pick a pet that will make a great companion for you-not just the one that will have the most profitable offspring or cost less to start with. This animal is not a factory to create items for you to sell. It should fit well with you and your family, and be a pet you can be proud to show off to those interested in its offspring.

You will also need to be educated on the breed to explain to potential buyers what to expect. Contact your local veterinarian to see if they can refer you to someone who has been successfully breeding that would show you the ropes. The best way to educate yourself is by reading about breeding and the breeds you are interested in.

Initial Investments

Be prepared to spend over $1000 right from the start no matter what pet you chose. My dog had taken up around $1200 before he was a year old. After buying the pet, switching over all of their AKC registrations, and getting them everything they need you will have spent more than you will probably make off of your first 2 litters.

Invest in great living conditions for your pet. Keep them as comfortable as possible, well fed, watered, and happy. Remember, as far as your ‘customers’ are concerned this pet is the ‘prototype’ for the pups they want to buy. Training your pet is a fantastic idea. You can do this yourself or spend at least $300 on a trainer or classes. I used YouTube to find ways to train my pet for free and he amazes even me!

Complications

Be ready to hand some cash to your veterinarian, and that’s if you DON’T suffer any complications. Expect to spend at least a hundred dollars on your pet before the first litter comes. From basic shots every dog needs to checkups around the due date, you will be seeing a lot of your local pet clinic.

The clinics I work for see many breeders. We recently performed caesarian sections on 3 different mothers for 3 different breeders (on 3 very different dogs) because they could not deliver. Be prepared emotionally and financially for a challenging pregnancy but hope to avoid one. Set aside at least $500 for complications during delivery.

And the Total is…

I recommend at least a $5000 savings be set aside before starting this venture. I also would not suggest breeding to anyone who does not have the time and money to properly tend to their pets. I have discussed the most important monetary factors in making the decision to breed but other things should be considered also;

You will have to advertise, be prepared to keep any of the litter that doesn’t find homes and be able to part with the ones that do. Breeding is not for everyone or every pet.

As a closing statement, I would also like to remind you that breeding should only be done to continue a healthy bloodline. Never just breed to make money. Our shelters are filled with wonderful pets that would suit someone just as well as a thoroughbred.

March Anthony
Marc is an overlander who loves living in an RV with his dogs and loves to talk about them all the time!

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

- Advertisement -

Latest Articles